Microsoft Engineer installs Google Chrome when Microsoft Edge crashes during presentation – Hilarious!

Microsoft presenter Michael Leworthy was doing a presentation showing the new features of Microsoft Azure. While doing his presentation suddenly the web browser Microsoft has been presenting as the best browser in the world, Edge, crashed. Leworthy was forced to install Google Chrome to finish his presentation.

While people in the audience were giggling, the Microsoft engineer tries to continue presenting like nothing happened. It shows, however, how Microsoft (and other companies) have been struggling to keep up with Google. Chrome is the most popular web browser in the world, leaving the competition far behind.

Michael Leworthy was man enough to upload the presentation himself, showing Microsoft does have some sense of humour. Then again, the presentation does not say anything negative about Azure. So if the video goes viral, they might still get some sales from it.

Watch the full presentation below below. The funny stuff happens at around 37 minutes:

Microsoft, once known as the most powerful tech company in the world, has been struggling to regain its focus. Their operating systems are still the most widely used, but they seem to be having some issues with their other products.

Bad business moves, like replacing Windows Live Messenger with Skype, or continuing to change the name of the most popular e-mail service in the world, Hotmail, did not do them any good either. Especially because they did this during the rise of Gmail, causing Google to take the take their territory on the market at an amazing speed.

We honestly hope that some day Microsoft will become the giant that it once was, again. And if not, then at least we got some funny videos like the one above. That is worth something as well.

Sources: The Hacker News, Youtube

Microsoft internal bug database hacked in 2013 and silence followed

Microsoft’s internal database for bug tracking was hacked over 4 years ago. The hack was already discovered in 2013 but was never disclosed to the public. The hacked database contained a list of secret security flaws and possible exploits within its widely used software. They managed to fix the issue within months after that. However, something that is disturbing is that the public was never informed. During the months Microsoft was creating solutions to combat the possible exploits, the public was exposed to numerous threats without knowing about it.

The company checked to see if the leaked information had been used in other breaches around that same time, before Microsoft was able to patch them. According to insiders they were unable to link the hack to any other breaches happening before that. Since then the company has put more emphasis on internal security and former employees state that hacks like this will probably not occur anymore in the future.

But the fact remains the public should have been informed, even if it meant that the hackers likely would have used the exploits more aggressively since they knew the hack was discovered. If the public had been informed about what happened, companies, users and even governments could have taken preventative measures to ensure their security. The fact that Microsoft didn’t disclose that the breach occurred isn’t a great move at all.

“Bad guys with inside access to that information would literally have a ‘skeleton key’ for hundreds of millions of computers around the world,” said Eric Rosenbach, the U.S. deputy assistant secretary of defense for cyber at the time.

The dangers posed by information on such software vulnerabilities became a matter of broad public debate this year, after a National Security Agency stockpile of hacking tools was stolen, published and then used in the destructive “WannaCry” attacks against U.K. hospitals and other facilities.

Only one breach of a big database from a software company has been disclosed. In 2015, the nonprofit Mozilla Foundation – which develops the Firefox web browser – said an attacker had gotten access to a database that included 10 severe and unpatched flaws. One of those flaws was then leveraged in an attack on Firefox users, Mozilla disclosed at the time.
In contrast to Microsoft’s approach, Mozilla provided extensive details of the breach and urged its customers to take action.

Sources: Engadget, Reuters