WIFI Hacking Tutorial: Using Aircrack, DeAuth and Wordlists to hack WIFI networks

Our tutorial today will be about WIFI hacking using the DeAuth attack, most useful for hacking WPA/WPA2 networks. It works by aquiring a handshake and decrypting it using a wordlist.
The system used in the tutorial is Kali linux, but it will work for any .deb based system (Debian, Mint, Ubuntu, etc.) and the technique will not be much different for other distributions either.

1: The tutorial is pretty straightforward, and starts out by putting your network adapter in monitor mode using AIRMON-NG.

2: Next we use AIRODUMP-NG to monitor and receive packets. Your network adapter then receives beacons. This means you get a clear view of all the different WIFI networks around you. After this you select the correct BSSID from the list, and the correct channel.

3: Using AIREPLAY-NG and filling in the correct BSSID and channel, we launch a DeAuth attack using a simple command. Then we wait until a so called “handshake” is received.

4: Close all the processes and start cracking the .cap (capture) file. This will be done using a wordlist. The program used for this is AIRCRACK-NG. Any wordlist saved as a .txt file will do. The bigger the wordlist, the more chance you have of cracking it.

Extra: A good wordlist to use is called the RockYou wordlist, wich is available for download here.

Below is a full tutorial video showing you the exact codes and steps in detail, so you will never make a mistake when you carry out your attack!

With credits to Razzor Sharp for his amazing video!

WPA2 Security Flaw – KRACK-Key Installation Attack

Recently new administrative vulnerabilities were discovered in the WPA2 security protocol, which is a 13-year-old WiFi authentication method to secure WiFi associations and still the most common used system for computers, phones and routers.

According to ZDNet, this security flaw affects our homes, organizations and system administration organizations that manufacture them as well.Such a security flaw threatens the safety of data like passwords, and personal information like chatlogs, photographs and credit cards.

Mathy Vanhoef of imec-DistriNet, KU Leuven discovered that the attack called “KRACK-Key Reinstallation Attack” works by exploiting a 4-way handshake of the WPA2 protocol.

Video with proof of concept:

For a KRACK attack to be successful, an already-in-use key is re-installed by tricking the victim. That leads to the manipulation and replay of cryptographic handshake messages.

When the attacker is within physical range of a vulnerable device, network traffic could be decrypted, connections could be hijacked, and any content could be injected into the traffic stream. Simply said: The attack allows new devices with a pre-shared password to join the network. This flaw, if exploited, gives an attacker a skeleton key to access any WPA2 network without a password.

Microsoft Windows and the latest versions of Apple’s iOS are largely immune from the flaws, according to security researcher Kevin Beaumont, in a blog post. However, Vanhoef said the security issue is “exceptionally devastating” for Android 6.0 Marshmallow and above.

Although security experts said it wasn’t clear if any attacks had been seen in the wild, over an insecure network sites and services with HTTPS traffic will encrypt the data from the browser to the server.

The warning was uncovered around the time of the Black Hat security conference, when Vanhoef presented a talk on networking protocols, with a focus on the Wi-Fi handshake that authenticates a user joining a network.
The cyber-emergency unit has since reserved 10 common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE) records. Those can be found here.

Krack, as it is called on the internet right now, shows us that for over 13 years while everyone believed they were securely browsing the internet, they were not. And it is just an example of something that is uncovered, but who knows what is still to come? It is another reason why you should always be vigilant and stay up to date with security issues. Because no one else will do it for you.

Sources: ZDnet